"Lough Derg" by Thomas D'Arcy McGee

Dublin Core

Title

"Lough Derg" by Thomas D'Arcy McGee

Subject

Lough Derg--Poetry--Catholicism--Thomas D'Arcy McGee

Description

"In a girdle of green, heathy hills,
In song-famed Donegal,
An islet stands in a lonely lake,
(A coffin in a pall)..."

Creator

Thomas D'Arcy McGee, 1825-1868

Source

D'Arcy Magee, Thomas, The poems of Thomas D'Arcy McGee : with copious notes: also an introd. and biographical sketch, pp. 483-86

Publisher

P.J. Kenedy, New York

Date

1902

Contributor

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

Rights

Public domain

Format

Monograph

Language

English

Type

Poetry collection

Identifier

DD_0194

Coverage

54.616218, -7.876212

References

https://archive.org/details/poemsofthomasdar00mcge_0/page/n9

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

i.
In a girdle of green, heathy hills,
In song-famed Donegal,
An islet stands in a lonely lake,
(A coffin in a pall),

A single stunted chesnut tree
Is sighing in the breeze,
While to and fro “the Pilgrims” flit,
Or kneel upon their knees;

Down to the shore, from North and East,
From Antrim and the Bosses,
Come barefoot pilgrims, men and maids,
Through water-ways and mosses;

And some from Dublin city, far,
Where sins grow thick as berries,
From Sligo some, and Castlebar,
Come crossing by the ferries.

ii.
Oh ! blessed Isle, a weary wight,
In body and in spirit,
Last year amid your pious ranks
Deplored his deep demerit;

And though upon his youth had fall’n
A watchful tyrant’s ban.
Though sorrow for the unfought fight,
And grief for the captive man, *

Peopled his soul, like visions
That cloud a crystal sleep,
These sorrows there pass’d from him —
’Twas his sins that made him weep.

And forth he went, confess’d, forgiven.
Across the heathy hills,
His peace being made in heaven,
He laugh’d at earthly ills.

iii.
Oh ! holy Isle, a ransom’d man
On a far distant shore,
Still in his day-dreams and his sleep
Sits by the boatman’s oar;

And crosses to your stony beach
And kneels upon his knees,
While overhead the chesnut-tree
Is sighing in the breeze;

And still he hears his people pray
In their own old Celtic tongue,
And still he sees the unbroken race
From Con and Nial sprung;

And from departing voices hears
The thankful hymn arise —
That hymn will haunt him all his years,
And soothe him when he dies.

iv.
Oh, would you know the power of faith,
Go ! see it at Lough Derg;
Oh, would you learn to smile at Death,
Go ! learn it at Lough Derg;

A fragment fallen from ancient Time,
It floateth there unchanged,
The Island of all Islands,
If the whole wide world were ranged.

There mourning men and thoughtful girls,
Sins from their souls unbind;
There thin gray hairs and childish curls
Are streaming in the wind ;

From May till August, night and day,
There praying pilgrims bide —
Oh, man hath no such refuge left,
In all the world wide !

Original Format

Poem

Collection

Citation

Thomas D'Arcy McGee, 1825-1868, “"Lough Derg" by Thomas D'Arcy McGee,” Digital Derg: A Deep Map, accessed April 18, 2021, https://digitalderg.eu/items/show/212.

Geolocation