"The stones become doubly slippery and the whole slope acquires a slithery and greasy surface"

Dublin Core

Title

"The stones become doubly slippery and the whole slope acquires a slithery and greasy surface"

Subject

Lough Derg--Pilgrimage--Description--Alice Curtayne

Description

"The stone circles [of the Penitential Beds] are small. When this sanctuary was demolished in the seventeenth century the despoilers left only the rude foundation stones protruding from the soil..."

Creator

Alice Curtayne, 1898-1981

Source

Curtayne, Alice, Lough Derg: St. Patrick’s Purgatory, p. 170

Publisher

Burns Oats and Washbourn, Ltd., London and Dublin

Date

1944

Rights

Citation for the purposes of criticism

Format

Monograph

Language

English

Type

History

Identifier

DD_0148

Coverage

54.608913,-7.870977

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

The stone circles [of the Penitential Beds] are small. When this sanctuary was demolished in the seventeenth century the despoilers left only the rude foundation stones protruding from the soil. Over these the pilgrims walk to-day: they are stones not merely sharp, but frequently so steeply inclined on the slope that it is difficult to get a footing on them. When hundreds are making the exercise at the same time, fatigue is trebled in the cramped space. The pilgrims have to kneel as best they can on the jagged rocks; some of them (aged and excusable) rise by leaning heavily on the shoulders of others, who are still kneeling. To understand the possible misery of it, think of rainy conditions, frequent on the island, when the stones become doubly slippery and the whole slope acquires a slithery and greasy surface." (p. 170)

Original Format

Monograph

Collection

Citation

Alice Curtayne, 1898-1981, “"The stones become doubly slippery and the whole slope acquires a slithery and greasy surface",” Digital Derg: A Deep Map, accessed February 3, 2023, https://digitalderg.eu/items/show/165.

Geolocation