Purgatory at Inis Cealtra

Dublin Core

Title

Purgatory at Inis Cealtra

Subject

Lough Derg--Travelogue--Inis Cealtra--Purgatory

Description

A nineteenth century translation of a German travelogue in Ireland.

Creator

Johann Georg Kohl, 1808-78

Source

Kohl, Johann Georg, Travels in Ireland, p. 68

Publisher

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts

Date

1844

Contributor

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts: a project of University College, Cork. Electronic edition compiled by Beatrix Färber, Sara Sponholz.

Rights

Citation for the purposes of criticism

Format

Electronic text transcription

Language

English, translated from German

Type

Travelogue

Identifier

DD_0558

Coverage

52.915425,-8.450025

References

https://celt.ucc.ie//published/T840000-001

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

"The most celebrated of these islands is Innis-caltra (Innis Island), which is an ancient holy place, containing the ‘Seven Churches,’ and one of those pillar-like structures called ‘round towers,’ of which some account will be found in the sequel. We saw this island in the centre of a bay at the distance of a mile and a half, and by the aid of a telescope could distinctly perceive the most remarkable buildings. A dispute arose among the Irish as to whether the famed ‘St. Patrick's Purgatory’ was to be found on this island or on another in one of the northern lakes, but opinions were much divided on the subject. It may be that the people relate this tradition of several islands; but that the purgatory of the holy St. Patrick, once so famous through the half of Christendom, was situated in one of these little islands of Lough Derg, is acknowledged and satisfactorily proved by all Irish antiquarians. The people once imagined that here was to be found the suburbs of purgatory, or, in a word, the entrance to the lower world. St. Patrick, who converted the Irish to the Christian faith, is said to have obtained permission from God that the entrance to the lower world should be opened in Ireland itself, in order to convince unbelievers of the immortality of the soul, and of the punishments and sufferings the wicked must endure after death."

Original Format

Travels in Ireland. Johann Georg Kohl First edition [xii+417 pages] Bruce and Wyld, 84 Farringdon St. London (1844)

Citation

Johann Georg Kohl, 1808-78, “Purgatory at Inis Cealtra,” Digital Derg: A Deep Map, accessed June 22, 2024, https://digitalderg.eu/items/show/579.

Geolocation